Journalism Student Link Dump

Articles, blog posts, videos, screencaps and links that are informative and interesting or not. Mainly, things to remember.

2,196 notes

shortformblog:

prweek:

When Self magazine asked cancer survivor Monika Allen for permission to use her photo from last year’s LA Marathon, she was excited for the opportunity. Allen wore a tutu and Wonder Woman shirt during the race, which fell in the midst of her chemotherapy, because she said it gave her motivation.  Allen didn’t expect to be mocked by the magazine, though. Self published her photo on the lame side of its “BS Meter” and wrote, “People think these froufrou skirts make you run faster. Now, if you told us they made people run away from you faster, maybe we would believe it.” Self editor-in-chief Lucy Danziger later apologized, saying “I am personally mortified. I had no idea that Monika had been through cancer… It was a stupid mistake.”

This is why, when asking for permission for photos, you don’t use those photos to mock the subject.

shortformblog:

prweek:

When Self magazine asked cancer survivor Monika Allen for permission to use her photo from last year’s LA Marathon, she was excited for the opportunity. Allen wore a tutu and Wonder Woman shirt during the race, which fell in the midst of her chemotherapy, because she said it gave her motivation.

Allen didn’t expect to be mocked by the magazine, though. Self published her photo on the lame side of its “BS Meter” and wrote, “People think these froufrou skirts make you run faster. Now, if you told us they made people run away from you faster, maybe we would believe it.”

Self editor-in-chief Lucy Danziger later apologized, saying “I am personally mortified. I had no idea that Monika had been through cancer… It was a stupid mistake.”

This is why, when asking for permission for photos, you don’t use those photos to mock the subject.

193 notes

Two CNN Producers Arrested in Sad Attempt to Break into the WTC Site

shortformblog:

bestrooftalkever:

what i would give to see this as an actual news story.

"And as you can see, it is extremely easy to-"
"Sir, get down."

"And as we’ve seen, the security at this part of the fence seems to-"
"Sir, please. Don’t make us ask you again."

"Many have noticed that security-"
"ok, you’re both coming with us."

NEWS!

We’ve reached the point where CNN is more reality TV than news. No turning back from here. Pretty soon, cable news is going to look kinda like this:

Remember this day, folks. It’s a sad one.

28 notes

Just as women and journalists of color are beginning to have a major presence in more traditional newsrooms, the disruptive white boys are jumping ship and starting their own ventures — only to replicate the same diversity problems newspapers and magazines have struggled with for decades. (Problems, one could argue, that helped drive them into irrelevance.)

Shani Hilton, deputy editor-in-chief for BuzzFeed, addresses some of the challenges in hiring a diverse newsroom and the lessons she has learned as BuzzFeed has worked to diversify their staff. 

Building A Diverse Newsroom Is Work — Medium

(via onaissues)

(via onaissues)

108 notes

Journalists my age and younger (I’ve been in the business since 2005—right around the time digital media emerged as a plausible career option) have never operated under the illusion that a staff job at The New Yorker or a New York Times column was in our future. But nearly a decade into the digital-media revolution, another shift has occurred. It’s not just that journalists understand former “prestige” jobs will be nearly impossible to get. Now we don’t even want them.
Anne Friedman, The New Dream Job, Columbia Journalism Review (via futurejournalismproject)

63 notes

100 Years of Photographs Now Free to Embed

futurejournalismproject:

The News: 

Getty Images is dropping the watermark for the bulk of its collection, in exchange for an open-embed program that will let users drop in any image they want, as long as the service gets to append a footer at the bottom of the picture with a credit and link to the licensing page. For a small-scale WordPress blog with no photo budget, this looks an awful lot like free stock imagery.

Implications abound but this one is particularly interesting:

The biggest effect might be on the nature of the web itself. Embeds from Twitter and YouTube are already a crucial part of the modern web, but they’ve also enabled a more advanced kind of link rot, as deleted tweets and videos leave holes in old blog posts. If the new embeds take off, becoming a standard for low-rent WordPress blogs, they’ll extend that webby decay to the images themselves. On an embed-powered web, a change in contracts could leave millions of posts with no lead image, or completely erase a post like this one.

136 notes

thepoliticalnotebook:

100 Billion Dollar Baby. This is my first try at publishing on Medium — I know I’m late to the game on it. Here’s a piece on mismanagement of Afghan reconstruction funds and what that says about the Afghanistan endeavor as a whole.

SIGAR’s accounts of poor choices, bad planning and seemingly willful ignorance of the pitfalls of pouring money into a corrupt and leaking system usually deal with figures in the millions and billions. The recurring patterns in SIGAR’s watchdog work over the past six years create a narrative of loss on a massive scale ($10 billion, $34 million, $600,000). It speaks to a political desperation to will bundles of cash into a solution, a sort of futile attempt at political alchemy that magically turns money and infrastructure into long-term stability.

Read it here.

thepoliticalnotebook:

100 Billion Dollar Baby. This is my first try at publishing on Medium — I know I’m late to the game on it. Here’s a piece on mismanagement of Afghan reconstruction funds and what that says about the Afghanistan endeavor as a whole.

SIGAR’s accounts of poor choices, bad planning and seemingly willful ignorance of the pitfalls of pouring money into a corrupt and leaking system usually deal with figures in the millions and billions. The recurring patterns in SIGAR’s watchdog work over the past six years create a narrative of loss on a massive scale ($10 billion, $34 million, $600,000). It speaks to a political desperation to will bundles of cash into a solution, a sort of futile attempt at political alchemy that magically turns money and infrastructure into long-term stability.

Read it here.

(via nedhepburn)